Markets and Morality: Why We Shouldn’t Trust Markets with Our Civic Life

About a month ago, I finished up a series about Michael Sandel’s book, What Money Can’t Buy. I really enjoyed reading through the chapters and chewing on the material. As you may recall, I also highly recommended watching Prof. Sandel’s course: Justice. A few day ago, I noticed that one of Sandel’s more recent TEDTalks was […]

Twenty Online Talks That Will Change Your Life, Part 2

Yesterday, I began going through one of The Guardian’s articles about 20 online talks that could change your life. We got through the first 10 talks yesterday. In this post, we’ll look at the last 10 talks. 11. Shaking Hands With Death – Terry Pratchett 12. The Voices in My Head – Eleanor Longden If you have no experience with schizophrenia, […]

Twenty Online Talks That Will Change Your Life, Part 1

A little over a week ago, I wrote a post about the 20 biggest questions in science. It turns out, The Guardian must have been on a listicle-kick because they also recently published a list of the 20 online talks that could change your life. Some of these I’ve seen, so I thought I’d go through […]

If All You Have is a Hammer…: List of Biases in Judgment and Decision-Making, Part 13

The popular ending to the title of this post is, “… everything looks like a nail.” I’m sure you’ve heard this phrase (or some variant thereof) before, right? I bet you didn’t know that this represents an important cognitive bias, though. In fact, I didn’t know that this phrase was popularized by one of the giants of […]

Quick Thoughts on Amanda Palmer, The Art of Asking, Vulnerability, and Trust

Yesterday, TED posted the TEDTalk of Amanda Palmer. The name sounded vaguely familiar, but because I kept seeing tweets saying that “Palmer Wins TED,” I thought, I’ve gotta watch this talk. So, before I get into some of my thoughts it, I’ll let you watch it. Apparently, there’s been a big hullabaloo over Palmer accepting […]

Stop Consuming — Get Busy Creating

In one of those ubiquitous end of the year posts, Joshua Brown (financial advisor) and all-around fun guy (at least from what I can gather by following him on Twitter) wrote: The news is mostly not news. Believe me, I traffic in this stuff online and on-air every day. But let’s say it was all “real […]

Can the Discourse in American Politics Be Saved: The Lost Art of Democratic Debate

I came across a tweet earlier this morning that linked to a TEDTalk given by Michael Sandel in 2010. I’ve written about Prof. Sandel’s course “Justice,” so naturally, I was interested to see his TEDTalk. The title: “The lost art of democratic debate.” Of course, given the election tomorrow and the absurd hyper-partisanship in the […]

Solutions for Racism: How Race Affects Voting

A couple of days ago, I saw a tweet that linked to a TEDTalk from a few years ago. It was a TEDTalk from someone who I (and many others) hold in high regard: Nate Silver. Silver runs the FiveThirtyEight blog for the New York Times. He gained popularity in 2008 after he correctly predicted […]

Replacing the 40-hour Workweek with a 30- or 21-hour Workweek

This past summer, I posted a couple of articles from The Atlantic to Facebook. They both had to do with vacation — more specifically — the lack of vacation in the US when compared to other countries. As America’s health declines, I can’t help but think that there’s something to the idea of a shorter […]

Do You Know The Difference Between Left and Right?

This past weekend, someone tweeted a link for a YouTube video (of a TEDTalk) that I was surprised I hadn’t seen. It was a rather interesting video that claims to isolate the differences between Liberals and Conservatives. Based on research, the presenter related morals to politics. This was different from the way George Lakoff wrote […]