Board Diversity Paramount for Achieving Corporate Benefits

Earlier this year, there was some interesting research published about board diversity, as it relates to achieving corporate benefits. Specifically: Board diversity improves governance and product development especially in firms led by White men CEOs. There are at least two important implications of these findings. First, we have no evidence that firms with White CEOs …

How To Be a Better Person: Awe Yourself

Research published earlier this year seems to indicate that when we're "awed," we're more likely to engage in prosocial or altrusitic behaviour. The researchers conducted five different studies: Individuals higher in dispositional tendencies to experience awe exhibited more generosity in an economic game (Study 1). Experimentally inducing awe caused individuals to endorse more ethical decisions (Study …

What if There Were Live Music at the Doctor’s Office?

There was a really interesting study published earlier this year that had live music in a medical waiting room. The aim of the study was to learn more about the staff's perceptions of this live music, but as you might expect, the live music had an effect on patients, too: One of the unanticipated results of the music …

Convert PDF to DOC with a Mac — for FREE!

I like to think of myself as relatively computer literate. When I was in elementary school, I taught myself how to use HTML and created/designed my own website. I don't know if I've linked to it on here, but it's still functioning. Of course, I don't remember the login or password for it, so there's no way …

Choice Architecture: Even in “Heads or Tails,” It Matters What’s Presented First

If you're familiar with behavioural economics, then the results of this study will be right up your alley. The researchers set out to determine whether there was a "first-toss Heads bias." Meaning, when flipping a coin and the choices are presented "Heads or Tails," there would be a bias towards people guessing "Heads" (because it was presented first). Through running their …

Three Months Later and I’m Still Avoiding Dessert (and Sugar)

It's been over three months since my post about cessation of dessert eating, so I thought I'd offer a bit of an update. It was actually a lot easier than I thought it would be to stop eating sugar. I'm aware that this might be a result of my conviction to the matter and that some people …

Parenting “Truths” are Culturally-Based: Parenting Without Borders, Introduction

It's been some time since my last series (almost a year and a half ago) and even longer since the last time I did a series about a book. I've definitely read a number of books since then, but one that I've recently, I wanted to explore a bit more in-depth, so I thought I'd write a few posts …

Understanding is Inherent to Empathy: On Paul Boom and Empathy

I came across an article in The Atlantic recently that expressed the opinion that empathy might be overrated. You'll note that the way the headline is written: "Empathy: Overrated?" should already tell us that the answer is no (via Betteridge's law of headlines). While from the outset, I'm already noticing my bias against the idea of empathy being overrated, I did my best …

Women and Words: Women Who Read Objectifying Words More Likely to Seek Cosmetic Surgery

I've tried to write about this article on a few occasions and had to stop because I simply felt terrible with the implications of the research. In short, as the headline of this post suggests, when women read words that are objectifying, they're more likely to seek cosmetic surgery. I've written about the importance of words and how they …

The Partisan Gap Amongst Female Politicians is Likely to Get Worse

If I'm being honest, when I first read the title of this journal article "A partisan gap in the supply of female potential candidates in the United States," I didn't think twice. Pew often publishes surveys/research that seemed to indicate that the gap between the Democratic Party and the Republican Party, with regard to women candidates, was …