Wanna Lose Weight? Get Some Sleep!

There was some research published within the last year that you might be particularly interested in, should you be in the middle of or about to go on a diet (or you're interested in your health in general): This article provides an integrative review of the mechanisms by which sleep problems contribute to unhealthy food intake. Biological, cognitive, emotional, and …

Looking for a Husband or a Wife? It’s Time to Learn About Altruism

Human companionship. It's something that we all crave. In fact, a quick look at Google's autocomplete shows that two of the top three results for "how to get a" return "girlfriend" and "guy to like you." It's pretty clear that sharing our life with someone is something we'd like to do (generally, speaking). So, when I came across some …

What’s in an American City: Historically, Cars

Last fall, I came across a post on Vox about high-speed rail. If you've read some of the things I published when I first started writing, you'll know that I'm a big proponent of it. This post on Vox was meant to talk about some of the things that Americans can learn from Europeans when it …

A Brief History of Everything: Where Science and Spirituality Converge

In some fields, the deeper you get into them, the more the field seems to approach spirituality. A perfect example of this is science. No doubt, there's already plenty written about the convergence of science and spirituality, especially if you take a walk through the "self-help" section of a bookstore. And that's not to detract from it. For some, reading …

Buy Less Stuff: Parenting Without Borders, Part 2

In the Introduction, we broached the idea that the way other cultures parent might be more "right" than the way that the culture in North America parents, as discussed in the book Parenting Without Borders. In Part 1, we looked at some of the different cultural thoughts around sleep. There was also that stunning example of how it's …

The Importance of Literacy in Science

A few weeks ago, I heard a parent attempting to describe to their little one what time it was in a different time zone.  I don't precisely remember how the parent described the difference, but it got me to think about things of this nature and how we go about explaining them to our little ones. …

Babies Aren’t Meant to Sleep Alone: Parenting Without Borders, Part 1

In July, I began working on a series about the book Parenting Without Borders. Little did I know that I wouldn't be able to write the second post in that series until about 4 months later. To refresh your memory: Christine Gross-Loh exposes culturally determined norms we have about “good parenting,” and asks, Are there parenting strategies other …

Why It’s Important to Have Diversity (in age!) in Your Work Teams

If you had to guess, would you say that younger people or older people are better at learning abstract causal principles? When first thinking about this question, I would have thought that older people would be better at this given that they have more experience and that they might have been in analogous situations. However, the research …

Psychologists Want an Alternative to the DSM

In another life (or a different timeline, if you prefer) I didn't change paths and continued on to become a clinical psychologist. In that life (or timeline), I, and many other psychologists are using something totally different than the DSM and the psychologists in this timeline are jealous. Confused? Recent research published sought to see if …

Perseverance Negatively Correlated with Counterproductive Work Behaviours

New research shows that perseverance might be a key character strength when it comes to counterproductive work behaviours. The researchers were interested in finding the character strengths that were most correlated with work performance and counterproductive work behaviours (things like absenteeism, lateness, incivility, etc.). As the title of this post suggests, the researchers found that perseverance is the character …