Neither the Beginning nor the End — Remember the Middle: List of Biases in Judgment and Decision-Making, Part 12

It’s Monday, so you know what that means — another cognitive bias! This week, I thought I’d combine two because they’re essentially two sides of the same coin. They are: the primacy effect and the recency effect. Believe it or not, these biases are just what they sound like. The primacy effect is the idea that …

He’s Not as Bad as it Seems and She’s Not as Good as it Seems: List of Biases in Judgment and Decision-Making, Part 11

Hello Hello! It’s been a little more than three weeks since my last post. I’ve finished up the requirements for the MBA, so I should be back to writing posts with some regularity. Since today’s Monday, I thought I’d restart that series of posting about a cognitive bias on Mondays. Today’s cognitive bias: the halo effect. …

WRAP — An Acronym from Decisive: List of Biases in Judgment and Decision-Making, Part 10

I recently came across a post from Farnam Street that seems like it would make a great addition to the series we’ve been exploring over the last 10 weeks (biases in judgment and decision-making). So, instead of going over another bias today, I thought I’d share the information I found and tie it back into our …

Ignore Sunk Costs: List of Biases in Judgment and Decision-Making, Part 1

It can be really fun to write a series of posts on a particular topic. By my count, I’ve done this at least seven times so far. Today, I’d like to start what I hope will be an oft-read series on biases in judgment and decision-making (to some, cognitive biases). Because of my background in …

Best of Genuine Thriving in 2012: Top Posts, Part 1

Most people have already written posts detailing the top articles/posts for their respective websites/blogs. I like to wait until after the year has “officially” ended, so that I can get an accurate total of which posts garnered the most views, shares, etc. Since I moved my writing from Genuine Thriving to here, I thought it …

Higher Education is More Like Telecommuting and Less Like Newspapers, Part 1

I came across an interesting article in The American Interest magazine a couple of days ago. It was by way of tweet (as it most often is). This tweet came from one of the professors at George Mason University, Prof. Auerswald. He’s done some really cool stuff, so be sure to check ’em out! The tweet …

If I were the CEO of CNN… (Part 1)

A few weeks ago, I was stuck in traffic so I flipped on NPR. As it was the 6 o’clock hour, Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal was on. To my delight, they were talking about the impending shift at CNN. That is, earlier this summer, the current CEO of CNN announced that he’d be stepping down …

What’s On My iPod: Songs From A Road Trip, LA to DC, Part 1

I’ve been away from writing posts for a while (my last post of quotes was on June 27th) because I’ve been driving across the country (well, countries). I spent the last part of June and the beginning of July driving from Long Beach to Washington, DC. It’s not an easy trip, especially if you’re driving …

Twitter: Who I’m Following, Part 1

So I did it. I finally did it. I joined the Twitterverse. I’m not sure how or why, but I had the strange idea that Twitter was mainly for cell phones and seeing as though I don’t have a cell phone, I never joined. A few months ago, I decided that I might dip my …

Altruism, To Give or To Take: Economics & American Public Policy, Part 1

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned that I wanted to do a series of posts on American Public Policy. This first post will be about America’s economic policy. As a disclaimer, I should say, economics can be a very academic field, in that there are hundreds of programs around the world that offer doctoral …